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Provence
Provence

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Provence
Provence

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FRANCE

Corsica

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Sea with a thousand shades of blue, mountain trails, waterfalls, medieval citadels. Wonder of the Mediterranean, Corsica is much more than the birthplace of Napoleon. What really captivates Corsica is its beautiful landscapes and wildness, yet so organized and caring. It has hilly peaks reaching as high as 2,700 meters, alpine lakes, forests, waterfalls and rocky shores surrounded by a sea ranging from turquoise to deep blue, full of unbelievable beaches. In the midst of this exuberance all villages change their faces as they move to the coast or inland and maintain a peaceful way of life. The architecture of the cities is carefully preserved, no huge or flashy buildings, all in neutral tones, always harmonizing with nature perfectly.

The story begins on March 1st, 1815 when Napoleon I set his foot on the beach of Golfe-Juan after one year of exile. At his side, 1,200 men ready to go to Paris to put the emperor back on throne. From this point begins a formidable epic journey of six days and 324 km. At the time, he took command of the Alps and followed the trail of the mules to avoid the monarchist resistance. The Napoleonic Route, officially named in 1932, follows religiously part of this route through two regions (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur and Rhône-Alpes) and four departments (Alpes-Maritimes, Alpes de Haute Provence, Hautes-Alpes and Isère). This is a wilder Provence that is part of the route. As the miles passed, Napoleon noted that his popularity was intact. Let us relive this legendary feat that brought Napoleon to Paris.

The Napoleon Route

Burgundy

It is said that travelers and true wine lovers sooner or later come to Burgundy in search of elegance, purity and emotions. And we will be no exception, cycling down isolated paths, smoother and leafier hills, past fairy tale castles, medieval bastions and picturesque villages, but never far from the sea of vineyards that have made Burgundy a privileged destination for gourmet visitors from all over the world. Throughout our week, we aim to help you understand some of the complexities and secrets behind two thousand years of viticulture, the concept of "terroir," the difference between a grand cru and a village denomination, and also how to Burgundian gastronomy has evolved over the centuries to form a perfect harmony with the exceptional Pinot Noir and Chardonnay that are produced there.

Get ready for a week of biking in the heart of France! Let us explore the Touraine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site located in the Loire Valley, cross lush landscapes with wheat fields, vineyards and sunflowers. We will ride along the banks of the longest and wildest river in France, the Loire that cuts dense oak forests. Imagine yourself at the court of Francis I as you walk through lounges and exquisite gardens of Renaissance castles as majestic as Chambord or Chaumont. The Touraine is a paradise. Local specialties include pork "rillettes" and "rillons", Géline de Touraine, freshwater fish, vegetables and spicy goat cheese. There is so much variety of fresh produce there, that the Loire Valley is known as the Garden of France.

Loire Valley

Provence

The charm of Provence is indisputable! Its lavender plantations, sunflower fields and typical seasonings sharpen our senses. In the cradle of the French gastronomy, we will have a sample of aromas and flavors that will be tasted slowly and the day to day will be toasted with the best wines of this region. At night, castles and hotels of charm await us for the well-deserved rest.